what difference can it make – evaluating impact?

Exif_JPEG_PICTUREIn this section of my website I will be pulling together the Evidence Base that exists from the UK and USA literature for effective use of art therapy with children and young people. I will also explore current research which helps us understand the changing mental health needs of children and young people.

Articles

Art Therapy Research. Wadeson, Harriet, Art Education, v33 n4 p31-35 Apr 1980. In this overview, the author discusses the need for art therapy research, problems it entails, and types of research approaches which may be used.

Connecting with the image: how art psychotherapy can help to re-establish a sense of epistemic trust, Elizabeth Taylor Buck, Dominik Havsteen-Franklin, ATOL: Art Therapy OnLine 01/2013; 4(1) (download here Havsteen-Franklin_Atol4(1)V2)

Overcoming Organisational Challenges Together, Dominik Havsteen-Franklin, ATOL: Art Therapy OnLine, 5 (1) © 2014 (download here Overcoming Organisational Challenges Together)

Art Therapy for Children, How it Leads to Change, Diane Waller, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Vol 11(2): 271-282. Sage 2006 (download here Art Therapy for Children, How it Leads to Change)

Videos

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1TBqEJMe3k

Prof. Peter Fonagy spoke at the launch of the ICAPT Research in Arts Psychotherapies University Alliance. Here he explores the ‘third instinct’: human communication as central to all psychological therapies. September 2012.

Organisations

Art Therapy Online (ATOL)

An international, peer-reviewed, open access and index linked journal that addresses theory, practice and research in relation to art therapy as it is known and understood around the world.

ATOL publishes contributions by practitioners who engage with different kinds of therapeutically-oriented, art-based work in health and disability services and social, educational and criminal justice systems in different countries. The social, political and visual context of such practice not only shapes its nature but also influences how the discipline develops. ATOL aims to capture and critically engage with this diversity and so address the multi-cultural development of the visual arts in therapeutic work around the world.

http://eprints-gojo.gold.ac.uk/atol.html

Art therapy Research Practice Network

The ATPRN is a UK wide group of practising art therapists who collaborate on practice-led research and evaluation ventures. It involves meeting and working with other ATs who are grappling with similar issues. The ATPRN is aimed at helping practitioners evaluate services and produce publishable research evidence for Art Therapy.

http://www.baat.org/atprn.html

Centre for Arts Therapies Research

The Centre for Arts Therapies Research (CATR) heralds a new phase for the development of Arts Therapies research; it promotes integrated and complex understandings of the intersections between art, science, psychological and psychotherapeutic processes.

http://www.roehampton.ac.uk/Research-Centres/Centre-for-Arts-Therapies-Research/

International Art therapy research collective

http://www.internationalarttherapy.org/researchcollaborative.html

International Centre for Research in Arts Therapies

A new Centre at Imperial College London that aims to explore the potential benefits of using arts therapies to treat physical and mental disorders.

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/newssummary/news_3-11-2009-10-51-5

Anna Freud Centre and Evidence Based Practice Unit

The Anna Freud Centre is committed to improving the emotional well-being of children and young people. They provide  treatments and services that work for young people who are suffering from mental health problems. The Unit is dedicated to finding the best ways to help young people with mental health problems. This involves bridging the worlds of research, service development, audit and service evaluation in clinics, schools and elsewhere.

http://www.annafreud.org/pages/camhs-evidence-based-practice-unit.html

 

 

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